New Comprehensive Advisory Service for Property Owners

Owning a real estate property is a big responsibility. To protect your rights as an owner, your property must meet all current legal and technical requirements. To give you the peace of mind that your real estate property does meet these requirements and is fully protected legally — both now and in the event of any change in the law — Tarraco Iuris law firm would like to offer you its comprehensive advisory service for property owners.

Based in Tarragona, our specialist team of lawyers and technical experts are ready to handle all your properly-related legal and administrative needs, including the handling of any mediation process and other procedures and the drafting and lodging of documents for the Spanish authorities (local councils, provincial and regional governments, the cadastral register, the Land Registry, notaries public, the courts, etc.) or any third parties (adjoining property owners, neighbour associations, the community of owners, entities involved in expropriation processes, etc.).

To legally protect your property in Spain, we offer a complete range of technical and legal services that includes:

1. Helping you obtain a NIE (foreigner ID number required for tax purposes in Spain)
2. Drafting all property-related contracts, including preliminary, option-to-buy, purchase and sale, and lease agreements
3. Verifying property charges with the Land Registry
4. Verifying property zoning with the local council
5. Verifying any debts owed by the seller to the Community of Owners
6. Verifying that all tax due on a property has been paid (municipal property tax, tax on income from real estate property, etc.) and drafting and presenting any corresponding tax declarations
7. Providing an estimate of taxes and expenses so you can budget for the cost of transferring a real estate property
8. Verifying the applicable marital or inheritance law and advising you on the legal conditions for purchasing or transferring a property
9. Drafting title deeds for executing property transactions
10. Accompanying you to sign title deeds and any other notarial instruments, acting as advisers and/or translators
11. Assisting your negotiations with the bank for using the property as loan security
12. Registering title deeds with the Land Registry
13. Informing the local council of a change of ownership for the purposes of local taxes and fees
14. For sales by non-residents, preparing and presenting declarations on tax withheld for Spanish income tax and handling the collection of any refund
15. Preparing/lodging applications for:

a. Certificate of occupancy and energy efficiency certificate
b. Building technical assessment report
c. Certificate of structural soundness and certification of construction age

16. Plans and topographical surveys
17. Undertaking boundary demarcation and mediating in conflicts with neighbours
18. Undertaking historical investigations on properties and updating the cadastral record for divided or joined plots
19. Advising you on:

a. Utility connection and the possible use of wells and springs
b. New construction, reform or landscaping projects
c. Business projects
d. Road and path refurbishment
e. Land and building assessment

Are you sure your property is fully protected legally?

Do not hesitate to contact us for further information. Please contact us for any service you require that is not listed

Tarraco Iuris global management

Read this article in Russian
Read this article in German

The time has come to buy again real estate in Spain

After several years of continued declines in prices and sales volume, statistics finally start reporting positive results. Very small, but that break the downtrend. The international situation could perhaps encourage investment decisions in real estate in Spain.

A significant reduction in the number of Russian tourists is expected this year on the Spanish coast. The reasons for that are instability due to the crisis between Russia and Ukraine and especially the collapse of the ruble. But also the euro is undergoing a gradual devaluation, and it seems that this trend will continue in the future. However this news, apparently negative, may have another reading: every time it came to the devaluation of a currency, conscious citizens sought to invest their savings in goods, a kind of “safe haven”, and throughout history, the most common safe haven for money savings has always been investing in real estate.

In addition, the mentality of the Spaniards in this area is rather conservative and therefore the opinion prevails that every ordinary citizen should be owner of his living room in his life. This approach has a significant impact on the real estate market, as this has always led to a higher demand than expected at every economic stage. And, moreover, hundreds of thousands of foreigners dream of a quiet retirement or at the Spanish coast or a summer residence to come to it every year, and they do not hesitate to purchase a property where safely enjoy Spain in their own home. All of these factors bring us back to the beginning: it has always been assumed that investing in real estate in Spain is a reliable investment.

Despite the severe crisis of recent years, we must not forget that real estate has always been the best and safest way to invest our savings in Spain. And just because of the crisis, prices at back at a rational level and , according to the monthly statistics, gradually begin to rise.

Carlos Prieto Cid – Lawyer

Read this article in Russian
Read this article in German

Setting up a business in Spain as a way to obtain a residence permit

The conditions for non-EU foreign nationals who wish to set up a business in Spain and obtain a residence permit which includes permission to carry on an activity on their own account are a guarantee of the business owner’s solvency and the legality and viability of the business.

A residence permit for Spain (which also allows free movement within the Schengen area) can be obtained by setting up a business.  The legislation aims to prevent potential fraud by ensuring that the applicant for the residence permit with permission to carry on an activity on their own account is not planning to establish a dummy company, and that the business will generate jobs and contribute to the nation’s prosperity.

How can it be proved that the business has sufficient funds with which to implement the planned investment?  How high is the expected return on the investment?  How many jobs will be created?  Here, an opinion should be sought from a business association registered in Spain or an association for self-employed workers and freelancers.  The application for a residence permit with permission to carry on an activity on one’s own account, together with additional proof of the legality and viability of the business, must be submitted to the Spanish consulate in the respective country in which the applicant usually resides.  Only once the office approves the application will a visa be issued for travel to Spain and the establishment of a business.  For this reason, the process is usually undertaken in collaboration with Spanish partners, who will work on the setting-up of the business until a residence permit has been issued.

Carlos Prieto Cid – Lawyer

Read this article in Russian
Read this article in German

Opening a business in Spain as a foreign citizen

When setting up a business in Spain, EU citizens have to meet similar conditions to those required of Spaniards.  In contrast, other foreign nationals, such as Russian citizens, for example, are subject to a special procedure if they want to carry on a business activity in Spain.  In future, it is likely that this procedure will also apply to business start-ups by Swiss nationals.

Unlike employees of third parties, who could be seen as a threat by job-seekers, investors are always welcome.  Investors are both those who make use of their investments personally (a holiday home or retirement residence, for example), and those who invest as entrepreneurs in order to carry on a business activity on their own account.  However, when setting up a business in Spain, foreign entrepreneurs are not all subject to the same conditions.

A lot of dust has been kicked up by the news that a referendum was held in Switzerland in which it was decided to shortly make changes to the law to restrict immigration and the free movement of EU citizens.  One direct consequence of this restriction is that the agreement on free movement and free choice of residence within the Schengen area will have to be revised.  As always used to be the case, Swiss nationals will then no longer be able to settle in Spain and carry on a business without meeting the same conditions as other non-EU citizens, such as Russian citizens, for example.  In contrast, EU citizens from member states in the Schengen area can set up a business in Spain virtually unhindered.

Carlos Prieto Cid – Lawyer

Read this article in Russian
Read this article in German

New campaign of the Tax Agency to demand the payment of income tax to non-residents

Even if they are fiscally non-resident, owners of real estate in Spain must file a separate income tax return each year and pay the so-called income tax for non-residents (IRNR) for revenues earned from the property .

The Spanish state tax authorities have not been very demanding until now regarding the payment of income tax to fiscally non-resident property owners. Many homeowners are not aware of the existence of this tax liability and can not understand why they have to file a tax return and pay this tax in Spain, despite the fact that they are not getting any income. They come to Spain just to spend their holidays: they do not work, they do not receive interest income from cash deposits in the bank, they do not rent their property. However, the mere possession of a property in Spain, as in other European countries, is considered by the law as income, even if the property is not rented. State tax rules require that the owner gets benefit of his own real estate anyway, even though these objects are not leased. The only exceptions are the cases in which the property is one’s own domicile or if the property is devoted to economic activity. Both cases can never happen with non-residents.

There is another tax, the municipal tax on property ownership, the so-called IBI (Spanish Impuesto Sobre Bienes Inmuebles), the payment of which the local municipality requires to property owners each year, and which is calculated and declared by the administration itself. In contrast, in the case of the state income tax for non-residents – IRNR-, the tax inspection is not mandated to prepare tax returns for the non-residents, but it is the taxpayer himself who is required to provide an annual tax return, and calculate and pay the property taxes on its own initiative.

This month, many homeowners who spend their holidays in their own apartments or private homes in Spain, received a letter from the Spanish tax authorities, reminding of the existence of the tax on the income of non-residents and the obligationy of paying it. Earlier, the state tax agency was very generous regarding this tax. Now, however, given that the economic situation is so bad, it appears that IRS has become stricter, requiring submission of tax returns and payment of this tax by all non-residents who own property in Spain.

Carlos Prieto Cid – Lawyer

Read this article in Russian
Read this article in German

Impact of the new Spanish Coastal Law in existing buildings and coastal preservation

The last revision to Coastal Law pretends to achieve an economic use of the coasts sustainable over time and respectful with the environmental protection. The changes introduced give more legal certainty and clarity and solve some short-term problems created by the previous legislation, but in practice, they reduce the chances of preserving the coastal strip.

The Coastal Law was adopted in 1988 and assumed significant changes in relation to the former regime. Nevertheless, the legislator was very cautious and therefore decided that the legal changes should not immediately entry into force but be delayed over the time. This has led to a conflicting application of the rule and even to its retreat: the law of 1988 failed to defeat the established social realities and that is actually why the government decided that it should be corrected. On the other hand, this law of 1988 created significant legal uncertainty that caused the resolution of the European Parliament in 2009, asking the Spanish authorities to “urgently review and, if necessary, modify the action of the Coastal Act to protect the legal rights of dwelling property owners and those who own small plots in the coastal areas, which do not adversely impact on the coastal environment … “.

Let’s analyze the key amendments of the reform:

1 – Clarification and specification of the concept of marine and coastal public property and improvement of the procedure of demarcation of boundaries:

The littoral is legally defined as the strip where the sea meets the land. The Spanish Constitution establishes that the littoral (including the coastal zone, the territorial sea and the beaches) will always be in any case public domain. Thus, it is important to recognize how far this common property extends, especially when we consider that the Spanish coast is the most densely populated area in the country and it concentrates the most strategic economic activities of the nation, such as tourism and fishing.

The law states that the coastal protection zone will be the land strip within reach of the biggest waves recorded during strong storms. This recording depends on technical criteria that should be created to give more confidence, reliability and stability at the borders.

The main innovation introduced in relation to the protected coastal zone is to reduce the width of the legal easement from one hundred to twenty meters, but only in settlements which were not classified in 1988 as an urban area although they had the characteristics of such. This reduction also applies exceptionally   in the upper shores of the rivers, sensitive to the ebb and flow, in order to avoid that at sites far away from the river mouth, this easement of100 metershas to be respected.

Carlos Prieto Cid – Lawyer

Read this article in Russian
Read this article in German

New legal requirements for holiday homes

Our costs welcome millions of visitors during each season. Not all of them are owners of an apartment or a property or stay in a hotel. The majority of them decide to rent a holiday home during the stay. A new legislation fights against the black market on this sector and wants to guarantee the maintenance of our touristic brand.

The new legislation addresses to the touristic sector not (like in the past and without any great success) to the housing sector itself. This law considers a “vivienda de uso vacacional” those properties that are conceded by the owner, directly or indirectly, to other persons in exchange of a consideration. Because of this, every accommodation must have a “cédula de habitabilidad” and ensure that there is enough furniture and equipment according to the number of offered places for visitors. The “cédula de habitabilidad“ is a proof of flat’s habitability which is prepared by the architect and has to be proposed at local housing authority.

How to convert a house or an apartment into a „vivienda de uso vacacional“? The law simplifies this procedure by using the so-called „régimen de comunicación previa“. Hereby it is only necessary to display the intention to rent the flat at the local administration and without any delay it could be started with renting. In this display the owner declares the responsibility to ensure the necessary amount of above-named equipment. He also needs, besides the identity card, the „cédula de habitabilidad“, a confirmation of energy supply and an insurance contract with an adequate coverage.

In this point the municipality is getting involved. This means that it is possible that the community charges a certain fee which could be established in the financial regulation. It would be desirable that administration wouldn’t take advantage of this to generate new revenue. The law intends to secure the quality of the offered holiday homes and it doesn’t want to increase costs which could have the opposite effect namely a promotion of shadow economy. The success of this law depends on an easy handling without further costs as well as on a resolute control.

A holiday homes status as a “vivienda de uso vacacional” means that it could not be turned into a main or secondary residence. The owner has to register guests’ personal data and, in accordance to local security service, send them to the central administration of the police. The stay in a holiday home with this status could not last longer than three months.

Another question that should be answered is that it is not allowed to split the holiday homes. Some owners of larger estates usually rent single rooms to different persons. Or in some cases there are different segregated fully furnished apartments. In these case the law states that rent is only possible if there is an own „cédula de habitabilidad“ for each lodging. If there is none, the „régimen de apartamentos turisticos“ is applicable. For this it is necessary to show a reception with at least 10 square meters. Furthermore the minimum standards for hotels like weakly cleaning are to be maintained.

Carlos Prieto Cid, Lawyer

This article in German

The reintroduction of Spanish Wealth Tax

A few months ago, US President Barack Obama announced to Congress: ”This is not class warfare, it’s math.” If the crisis leads to a fall in revenue for public authorities, spending must either be cut or taxes increased.

If we assume that governments cannot cut back on social services because the social rights they have achieved should not be touched due to the crisis, then new tax increases become necessary. Instead of raising existing taxes, the former Spanish government had preferred to try to maintain the level of revenue it needs by reintroducing a recently-abolished tax: the IMPUESTO DE PATRIMONIO, or Wealth Tax.  This tax was never actually abolished, although the full rate was indeed scrapped in 2009 with a 100% rebate. The government has therefore simply done away with this rebate in order to reintroduce Wealth Tax.

The tax applies from 18 September 2011, although the concession is scheduled to increase once more in 2013. This means that Wealth Tax declarations need only be submitted for the years 2011 and 2012 (due on 31 December each year). It is important to remember that non-residents are also obliged to pay this tax. Declarations must be submitted to the tax office each year together with the income tax declaration.

The most important changes to the rules on Wealth Tax introduced in the Real Decreto-ley 13/2011 are the following:

1. Tax allowance on residences: the maximum rate for tax exemptions on the value of the own residence (for residents) has been raised to €300,000 (previously €150,253.03).

2. General tax allowance: unless the autonomous communities rule otherwise, the general tax threshold is €700,000.-

Whether these new rules and the reintroduction of the tax will have any real impact or affect public authorities’ revenues is debatable. It appears that the Socialist Party intended to make political capital through the reintroduction of a ‘tax on the rich’ (elections took place in a short time after de tax reform and they were a spectacular failure for the Socialist Party anyway ), but the real impact of the tax’s reintroduction will not be able to solve the difficult situation surrounding the public finances.

Carlos Prieto Cid, Lawyer

This article in German

Income Tax for foreign property owners

Foreign nationals who are not registered for tax in Spain but own property in the country must submit a tax declaration for their income tax to the state tax office every year. This involves the so-called Impuesto de la Renta de No Residentes (Income Tax for Non-residents).

Many property owners do not understand why they must declare and pay tax in Spain even though they earn no income here because they only come here for holidays and therefore neither work nor are involved in any economic activities or receive interest from banks on financial investments. There is usually no rental income from property either. Despite this, in Spain (much like in other European countries), simply owning a property is regarded as income, even when the property is not let or leased out. The state tax system assumes that a profit is made from the property even if it is not rented out, it is not the own home or if the property is not dedicated to economic activity, which for non-residents can never be the case.

How is this fictitious return calculated? Spanish law stipulates that income earned from the simple possession of a property equates to a certain percentage of its cadastral value. This percentage is either 2% or 1.1%, depending on the year in which the Spanish Land Registry (or rather, the respective municipality), updated its property values. The Land Registry (Catastro) is a national register of properties, answerable to the Spanish tax office, which gives the authorities information about these properties (owners, size, use, year of construction, boundaries, etc.). The information stored at the Land Registry can be submitted by Land Registry officials themselves, the municipalities or the owners of the property. One of the most important pieces of information on every property is in fact the cadastral value. This value is dependent on many other objective details and here on the coast can generally be a lot lower than the market price that we would set for the property.

Despite this, this objective value is decisive for almost all authorities and provides the basis for many taxes, including income tax for non-residents. This percentage of the cadastral value is therefore the basis for income tax for non-residents, which is currently 24%. Every year, the owners must pay the resulting sum by 31 December the following year. This means that foreigners who own a property in 2011 must submit their tax declaration to the tax office and pay the tax by 31 December, 2012. In 2008, the tax office changed the forms for this declaration, which caused problems for many foreigners who did not hear about this amendment in time. Until then, Form 214 was used, but now Form 210 must be completed. The change was a consequence of recent tax reforms, which saw the abolition of property tax. However, the tax for non-residents was retained because it is regarded as a form of income tax rather than a property tax.

Otherwise, for non-residents there are only the local rates, the so-called IBI, which are paid as a municipal tax that every municipality demands from property owners each year and which is calculated and demanded by the local authority itself.

Carlos Prieto Cid, Lawyer

This article in german

The risks of giving power of attorney

The event often arises when we would like to sell our Spanish holiday home or freehold apartment but we are unable to be there at the time of the required notarial certification of the contract of sale because we are only there occasionally on holiday.  A common solution in such cases is to authorise someone to represent us in the notarial proceedings.

InSpain, the transfer of a property only becomes valid once the person giving the authorisation has notarially submitted a letter of attorney.

Simple handwritten authorisation is not sufficient as there must be a notarial letter of attorney for such transfers, i.e. one prepared by a notary to make it legally valid and enable it to be entered in the land register.

This letter of attorney must be signed in the presence of a notary to allow them at that moment to verify our identity and legal status in their capacity as a representative of the state.  They are also obliged to inform us of the risks of giving power of attorney.

This formality is a guarantee for the person granting power of attorney, but it can also pose a risk because the document being officially issued by the notary is really a key with which the authorised person can do anything which is written in it when exercising the power of attorney.  Later, with the letter of attorney in their hand, they can act without the knowledge of the person giving the power of attorney, or even against their will, because the validity of the letter of attorney does not depend on the actual wishes of the person giving power of attorney, but on the officially declared wording of the certified wishes which is contained exclusively in the notarial declaration of authorisation.  This gives the third party, who is conducting business with the authorised person in good faith, the guarantee and security that the transactions are as far as possible valid, irrespective of what the person giving the authorisation might think, and Spanish law therefore does not provide any opportunity to restrict authorisation in the internal relationship, provided the letter of attorney is not notarially revoked.  It is therefore recommended that power of attorney should only be given for the benefit of a person we completely trust or that the authorised person is preferably a lawyer whose area of expertise is continually monitored by a relevant authority, such as the Colegio de Abogados (Bar Association).

It is also possible for a lawyer to simply represent us during the notarial sale without documented and express power of attorney, with the person represented confirming the legal transaction afterwards in the presence of the notary.  However, this approach attracts additional costs and can also have further drawbacks.  The transfer to the buyer is provisionally invalid, i.e. the transfer is not valid until the notarial confirmation has been entered in the land register.  This always presents difficulties if the buyer of the property has to bankroll the purchase price and requires a loan guaranteed by a mortgage, for example.  In such cases, the sale cannot take place because the mortgage only counts as a guarantee if it is entered in the land register.

Carlos Prieto Cid, Lawyer